Dungeons and Dragons Logo

I am not sure how it happened but recently I have become bitten by a bug to learn how to play Dungeons & Dragons. I have always been intimidated by the game and all the books associated with it. But on the flip side, so many people play this game that it can’t be all that hard to learn. Right?

Now, I am not a total newbie when it comes to Dungeons & Dragons. My old roommate and I, along with a few friends from work used to play D&D on weekends. It was a lot of fun to me even if I didn’t understand the whole mechanics of the game. But after 5 weeks or so we had to quit playing due to conflicting schedules. Ever since then I have felt like no game (computer, table top board, or other) I have played from that time on has pulled me in so tightly and captured my imagination so strongly. I know that’s a pretty bold statement to make. But the game was really that fun to me. I mean to be in a room with some of your good friends and playing a game of high adventure with boundless and endless possibilities. It’s just epic. It’s unmatched by any computer game. But it’s not just the adventuring, it’s the socializing with friends which is just as an addictive eliminate to the game as playing the game it’s self.

Vin Diesel explains why he fell in love with the fantasy role-playing game Dungeons & Dragons and what kept him playing even as he worked as a bouncer in New York City.

So with those good memories in hand, along with some local friends who would like to get a game of Dungeons & Dragons going I set off on my journey to learn how to play the game.

Like any good internet citizen I started off my quest by searching online for as much information on Dungeons & Dragons I could find. What I have learned was this:

  1. Dungeons & Dragons was designed by Gary Gygax and Dave Arneson, in 1974
  2. To play a game of Dungeons & Dragons you need some people to play as Adventures or Player Characters (PC) and one person to play as the Dungeon Master (DM).
  3. The game’s rules are detailed in three core rulebooks: The Player’s Handbook, the Dungeon Master’s Guide and the Monster Manual.
  4. The only items required to play the game are the rulebooks, a character sheet for each player and a number of polyhedral dice.

Now, for someone who is Dyslexic like me, reading through three players handbooks is a very intimidating task to under take. But with a little bit of spare time I should be able to read them in a few weeks. In the days to come I will be checking out local Books stores and online retailers like Amazon for the D&D rulebooks.

To Be Continued…

Youseph

The host of the YOSHICAST and TRANSMISSIONS Podcast. Transformers enthusiast and comic book collector.

This Post Has 10 Comments
  1. @Ben,
    Thank you very much. I really appropriate that. I still have a lot of reading and learning to do. I might very well pick your brain. Thanks for the offer.

  2. There ara much more then three books. Not only three. To play D&D you can reed this three books and play, but it is only for simple game. Only on 3.5 edition in my computer I have 19 books.

  3. @Pashira,
    Thanks for the comment. As I do more research in to D&D I am learning about all the other books you can get for it. All the extra campaign books and what not. But I think I want to play again first with friends before I invest in all the other books. Make sure I am going to play it you know?

  4. you might consider also geting players handbook 2 or eberon player guide or forgotten realms player guide because of the new races and classes in them.theres enough info on the interweb to decide what class you want to be in style and thats all that should matter not the mechanics and rules

  5. Hey,
    I wanted to mention that I have purchased a few D&D books off of ebay. Sometimes players that have lost interest in the game offload their books at a reduced price.

    Just a thought..

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